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One death reported after storms in NE Wisconsin

CREATED Aug 21, 2013 - UPDATED: Aug 22, 2013

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  • Video by wtmj.com

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  • Video by wtmj.com

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  • Video by wtmj.com

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  • Video by wtmj.com

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  • Video by wtmj.com

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  • Severe Thunderstorms knocked down trees and power lines on 8 /21/13. Image by Alex Hagan

  • Tree limbs scattered across a yard after severe thunderstorms rolled through Bear Creek on 8/21/13 Image by Sarah Bastian Zemlock

  • Some trees covered the road near Shawano, WI after a 8/21/13 thunderstorm Image by Alex Hagan

  • Straight-line winds in excess of 75 miles per hour were reported in places like Bonduel Image by Marvin Raditke

  • Photograph taken by Michelle Zich just as a lightning strike streaks across the sky over Appleton Image by Michelle Zich

  • The Second picture turns night into day for an instant during the 8/21/13 storm. Image by Michelle Zich

  • Then, the lightning passes and it's dark again across the Appleton area 8/21/13 Image by Michelle Zich

  • Victoria Celmer takes this picture shortly after the storms pass on 8/21/13 Image by Victoria Celmer

  • Damage reported in Brown County including the Oneida Street, Vanderperren Way area of Ashwaubenon Image by Brian Niznansky

  • Crews work to remove broken limbs and downed trees in Ashwaubenon Image by Brian Niznansky

GREEN BAY - A line of severe thunderstorms moved through portions of NE Wisconsin overnight, knocking down trees and power lines across a wide area North and West of the Fox Valley.

Menominee County Emergency Management reports one person was killed when a tree fell onto his vehicle. There were multiple traffic accidents across the region due to downed trees. Most of Menominee County is without power as of early Thursday morning.

There are pockets of damage reported across Brown County including the west side of Green Bay and Ashwaubenon.

At one time nearly 24,000 people were without power across Northern Wisconsin. WPS says that number is down to about 3,000.