Carbon monoxide mystery in Whitefish Bay

CREATED Jul. 18, 2013 - UPDATED: Jul. 18, 2013

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  • A mystery in Whitefish Bay today. Firefighters evacuated several homes there after detecting carbon monoxide in those homes. What's odd is that the CO has gone away, and no one is sure where it came from. Video by wtmj.com

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  • TODAY'S TMJ4 Reporter Nick Montes is live at the scene of a carbon monoxide leak in Whitefish Bay. Video by wtmj.com

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WHITEFISH BAY - There's a mystery in Whitefish Bay. Firefighters evacuated several homes after detecting carbon monoxide in those homes. What's odd is that the CO has gone away, and no one is sure where it came from.

"It's baffling," said North Shore Fire Chief Robert Whitaker.

The North Shore Fire Department was initially called late Wednesday to a home in the 4800 block of north Anita Avenue for CO alarms that were going off.

"The one in the basement first and the one on the second floor followed," said Eric Hsieh, who lives in one of the homes. "Because two separate alarms went off, we knew something wasn't quite right."

While firefighters were checking out the carbon monoxide at the first home, they got a call to a second building near the first. Firefighters evacuated that home.

"They are close to each other, but they are not connected to each other," Chief Whitaker said.

The biggest mystery is not just that the Carbon Monoxide disappeared, but that it was detected in two unconnected places.

"It's highly unusual that anything occuring in one building will go to the other in any sort of significant fashion that will set alarms off," Whitaker explained.

We Energies responded to the scene. It turned gas back on and checked for readings, but couldn't find a source.

No one was hurt, and it appears the early warning from the CO alarms alerted people to the problem before there was any affect on their health.

But Chief Whitaker and his crew are still puzzled over the cause.

"It's just unusal to the point where we're looking into any sort of similar occurrences across the country to see if we can tie anything together," said Whitaker.

Learn more about Carbon Monoxide poisoning, and what to do if your alarm goes off.