Tactical situation leads to stranded Shorewood residents, empty restaurants

CREATED Jun. 21, 2013

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  • Photo: Dan Selan

  • Photo: Jeff Brand Image by Photo: Jeff Brand

  • Photo: Jeff Brand Image by Photo: Jeff Brand

  • Photo: Jeff Brand Image by Photo: Jeff Brand

  • Photo: Jeff Brand Image by Photo: Jeff Brand

  • Photo: Jeff Brand Image by Photo: Jeff Brand

SHOREWOOD - Kevin Chwala couldn't go home for hours Friday night.

"I've kind of been standing here about three or four hours now, went to go get a bite to eat, and came back and they're still doing this so it's a little aggravating," Chwala told TODAY'S TMJ4's Annie Scholz.

A standoff in an apartment which lasted more than four hours Friday afternoon led to authorities diverting rush hour traffic off of Oakland Avenue.

No vehicles were allowed through except for law enforcement.

The Friday night dinner rush didn't happen at restaurants in the closed-off zone.

A manager at Harry's told Annie it's typically standing room only at 6:00 p.m., but on Friday night, there was nothing but open tables.

That's because Harry's was on the ground floor of the building where the standoff happened.

Derek Leo lives right above Harry's, but there was no going home after his work day.

"I came back just ten minutes ago, and I walked up, and they say it's a restricted area.  My cat's in my apartment.  I have to feed my cat," said Leo.

Squads from multiple law enforcement departments were called in to help direct traffic, but even then, congestion came for drivers, and confusion for pedestrians trying to figure out where they could go.

It turned into a headache for folks who couldn't get around, but relief that they were safe while they waited.

"I understand they have to protect our security and keep us safe but at the same time, maybe there's a better way to handle it," said Leo.

Many people told Annie that if they had to stand around and wait, they were grateful that the weather was not inclement.