Superstorm Sandy/Photo Gallery

Superstorm Sandy impacting southeast Wisconsin

CREATED Oct 29, 2012 - UPDATED: Oct 29, 2012

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  • Storm Team 4 interactive radar of Hurricane Sandy, as of 4:50 a.m. Monday. | Photo: TODAY'S TMJ4

  • Water is pumped from a restaurant on First Street in Hoboken, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Parts of the city are still covered in standing water, trapping some residents in their homes. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle) ORG XMIT: NJCR108 Image by Craig Ruttle

  • Steve Brett and his wife, Toi Brett, of Hoboken, N.J., look down First Street at high water near their home in Hoboken, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. The Brett's home was not damaged but their basement took on water. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle) ORG XMIT: NJCR107 Image by Craig Ruttle

  • Members of the National Guard and Hoboken Police ride a large truck through floodwaters used to pluck people from high water in Hoboken, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Parts of the city are still covered in standing water, trapping some residents in their homes. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle) ORG XMIT: NJCR105 Image by Craig Ruttle

  • David Bagatelle of Hoboken, N.J., walks from his residence on Park Avenue through high water Wednesday in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Bagatelle's home is surrounded by water. MORE PHOTOS Image by Associated Press

  • Early morning commuters cross New York's Brooklyn Bridge, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Morning rush-hour traffic appeared thicker than on an ordinary day as people started to return to work in a New York without functioning subways. Cars were bumper-to-bumper on several major highways. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Image by The Associated Press

  • Members of the National Guard stand ready with large trucks used to pluck people from high water in Hoboken, N.J. Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Parts of the city are still covered in standing water, trapping some residents in their homes. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle) Image by The Associated Press

  • Two women shop for groceries by flashlight in the Tribeca neighborhood of New York. ConEd cut power Moday to some neighborhoods served by underground lines as the advancing storm surge from Hurricane Sandy threatened to flood substations. Floodwaters later led to explosions that disabled a substation in Lower Manhattan, cutting power tens of thousands of customers south of 39th Street. Image by Associated Press

  • Christopher Hannafin, of South Kingstown, R.I., enters a friend's cottage through a window to salvage belongings from the structure destroyed by Superstorm Sandy, on Roy Carpenter's Beach, in the village of Matunuck, in South Kingstown. Image by Associated Press

  • A whitewater kayaker braves the large waves on Lake Michigan near the South Haven, Mich. lighthouse. High winds caused by Super Storm Sandy became a tourist attraction for many beach goers. Image by The Herald-Palladium

  • This photo provided by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority shows the South Ferry subway station after it was flooded by seawater during superstorm Sandy. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. Image by Metropolitan Transportation Authority

  • A parking lot full of yellow cabs is flooded as a result of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday in Hoboken, NJ. Image by Associated Press

  • Cars traveling the Grafton road, south of Morgantown, W.Va., turn through fallen trees and tree limbs resulting from a heavy snowfall Tuesday morning, Oct. 30, 2012. The storm that hit late Monday and into Tuesday dumped up to 19 inches of snow in West Virginia, cutting electricity to about 268,000 customers at its peak and closing dozens of roads. (AP Photo/The Dominion Post, Ron Rittenhouse) ORG XMIT: WVMOR101 Image by Ron Rittenhouse

  • Cars traveling the Grafton road, south of Morgantown, W.Va., turn through fallen trees and tree limbs resulting from a heavy snowfall Tuesday morning. The storm that hit late Monday and into Tuesday dumped up to 19 inches of snow in West Virginia, cutting electricity to about 268,000 customers at its peak and closing dozens of roads. Image by The Dominion Post

  • A Portion of Harvey Cedars on Long Beach Island, New Jersey is underwater a day after Hurricane Sandy blew across the New Jersey barrier islands. Image by The Philadelphia Inquirer

  • The New York Stock Exchange remains closed in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in New York on Oct. 30. It will reopen Wednesday. Image by Reuters

  • Robert Connolly, left, embraces his wife Laura as they survey the remains of the home owned by her parents that burned to the ground in the Breezy Point section of New York. More than 50 homes were destroyed in the fire which swept through the oceanfront community during superstorm Sandy. At right is their son, Kyle. Image by Associated Press

  • An ambulance is stuck in over a foot of snow off of Highway 33 West, near Belington, W.Va in Belington, W.Va. Superstorm Sandy buried parts of West Virginia under more than a foot of snow on Tuesday, cutting power to at least 264,000 customers and closing dozens of roads. At least one death was reported. The storm not only hit higher elevations hard as predicted, communities in lower elevations got much more than the dusting of snow forecasters had first thought from a dangerous system that also brought significant rainfall, high wind gusts and small-stream flooding. Image by Associated Press

  • Brian Hajeski, 41, of Brick, N.J., reacts after looking at debris of a home that washed up on to the Mantoloking Bridge the morning after superstorm Sandy rolled through in Mantoloking, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. Image by Associated Press

  • Floodwaters surround homes near the Mantoloking Bridge the morning after superstorm Sandy rolled through in Mantoloking, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. Image by Associated Press

  • A casket floated out of the grave in a cemetery in Crisfield, Md. after the effects of superstorm Sandy. Hundreds of people were displaced by floodwaters in Ocean City and in Crisfield. At the same time, 2 feet of snow fell in westernmost Garrett County, were nearly three-quarters of residents lost power. Image by Associated Press

  • Johnny Adinolfi is comforted by neighbor John Vento, right, as he stands in what was once the living room of his home in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy in Massapequa, N.Y. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. Image by Associated Press

  • Deputy Cliff Tice of the Dare County Sheriff's Department walks down damaged and impassable NC 12 leading into Mirlo Beach in Rodanthe, N.C. People on North Carolina's Outer Banks are facing some flooding and damage from Hurricane Sandy, but emergency management officials say it could have been worse. North Carolina Transportation Department spokeswoman Greer Beaty said the highway was closed Tuesday until crews inspect the road. Image by Associated Press

  • Foundations and pilings are all that remain of brick buildings and a boardwalk in Atlantic City, N.J. after they were destroyed when a powerful storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy made landfall on the East Coast on Monday night. Image by Associated Press

  • Nicholas Rodriguez looks over a section of the destroyed boardwalk in Atlantic City, N.J. not far from where a powerful storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy made landfall the night before. Millions of people from Maine to the Carolinas awoke Tuesday without electricity, but the full extent of the damage in New Jersey, where the storm roared ashore Monday night with hurricane force, was unclear. Image by Associated Press

  • People watching waves in Milwaukee. | Photo: Michael Greene

  • A boat floats in the driveway of a home in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Lindenhurst, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow) ORG XMIT: NYJD106 Image by Jason DeCrow

  • A pedestrian passes a fallen tree on East 7th Street in Manhattan's Lower East Side neighborhood, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. New York City awakened Tuesday to a flooded subway system, shuttered financial markets and hundreds of thousands of people without power a day after a wall of seawater and high winds slammed into the city, destroying buildings and flooding tunnels. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo) ORG XMIT: NYJM104 Image by John Minchillo

  • A swan makes its way down a flooded street in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Lindenhurst, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow) ORG XMIT: NYJD108 Image by Jason DeCrow

  • People and a dog ride on a National Guard vehicle after after being rescued from the Metropolitan Trailer Park in Moonachie, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing a number of deaths. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle) ORG XMIT: NJCR108 Image by Craig Ruttle

  • Residents assess damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point, in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) ORG XMIT: NYFF125 Image by Frank Franklin II

  • Trees lie fallen across parked cars in the Brooklyn borough of New York the morning after superstorm Sandy made landfall, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. A record storm surge that was higher than predicted along with high winds damaged the electrical system and plunged millions of people into darkness. Utilities say it could be up to a week before power is fully restored. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) Image by The Associated Press

  • A man photographs a home damaged during a storm at Breezy Point in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) ORG XMIT: NYFF123 Image by Frank Franklin II

  • Debris clearing begins in Hatteras at the Shipwreck Grill as the parking lot is cleared and the restaurant is open for business on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Bixton, Va. President Barack Obama has declared an emergency for Virginia as a result of superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Steve Earley) MAGS OUT ORG XMIT: VANOV101 Image by Steve Earley

  • Damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point is shown Tuesday in New York. A fire department spokesman says more than 190 firefighters are at the blaze in the Breezy Point section. Fire officials say the blaze was reported around 11 p.m. Monday in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. MORE PHOTOS Image by Associated Press

  • The Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Memorial sits in flood waters in downtown Annapolis, Md., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, after the superstorm and the remnants of Hurricane Sandy passed through Annapolis. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) ORG XMIT: MDSW107 Image by Susan Walsh

  • Workers use heavy machinery to clean up damage from superstorm Sandy Tuesday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., after a storm surge from Sandy pushed the Atlantic Ocean over the beach and across Beach Avenue. (AP Photo/Mel Evans) ORG XMIT: NJME101 Image by Mel Evans

  • Michael Brown, left, and Enos Jones, with Ocean City, fill a truck with debris as they clean the boardwalk after the effects of Hurricane Sandy Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Ocean City, Md. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon) ORG XMIT: MDAB102 Image by Associated Press

  • The streets surrounding the New York Stock Exchange are deserted as financial markets remain closed for the second day due to superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) ORG XMIT: NYRD103 Image by Richard Drew

  • Water reaches street level of the West Street entrance to the flooded Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/ Louis Lanzano) ORG XMIT: NYLL110 Image by Louis Lanzano

  • The lights on the Brooklyn Bridge stand in contrast to the lower Manhattan skyline which has lost its electrical supply, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, after megastorm Sandy swept through New York. A record storm surge that was higher than predicted along with high winds damaged the electrical system and plunged millions of people into darkness. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) ORG XMIT: NYML101 Image by Mark Lennihan

  • Water reaches the street level of the flooded Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Superstorm Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing a number of deaths. (AP Photo/Louis Lanzano) ORG XMIT: NYLL102 Image by Louis Lanzano

  • Elaine Belviso, 72, is rescued from her flooded home by Suffolk County police after being trapped there overnight by superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Babylon, N.Y. Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing a number of deaths. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow) ORG XMIT: NYJD103 Image by Jason DeCrow

  • Damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point is shown Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. A fire department spokesman says more than 190 firefighters are at the blaze in the Breezy Point section. Fire officials say the blaze was reported around 11 p.m. Monday in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) ORG XMIT: NYFF107 Image by Frank Franklin II

  • Damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point is shown Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire in the Breezy Point section, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) ORG XMIT: NYFF108 Image by Frank Franklin II

  • Kim Johnson looks over the destruction near her seaside apartment in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig) ORG XMIT: NJSW103 Image by Seth Wenig

  • Damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point is shown Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in in the New York City borough of Queen. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire in the Breezy Point section, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) ORG XMIT: NYFF109 Image by Frank Franklin II

  • Large chunks of the boardwalk are piled near an apartment building on the ocean in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig) ORG XMIT: NJSW101 Image by Seth Wenig

  • Damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point is shown Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in in the New York City borough of Queen. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire in the Breezy Point section, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) ORG XMIT: NYFF112 Image by Frank Franklin II

  • Snow coats Highway 33 West in West Virginia as Hurricane Sandy batters the eastern seaboard, and a cold weather system blankets most of the high elevations in West Virginia on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. As the systems meet, blizzard conditions are in effect across multiple counties in West Virginia, Virginia and Pennsylvania. (AP Photo/Robert Ray) Image by The Associated Press

  • Viewers react as waves crash against a seawall near homes in Scituate, Mass. Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) Image by The Associated Press

  • Walter Martiniano wades through a flooded street in the Red Hook neighborhood of Brooklyn in New York, U.S., on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy, the Atlantic’s Ocean’s biggest-ever tropical storm, barreled toward southern New Jersey after bringing a region with 60 million residents to a virtual standstill and upending the U.S. presidential race eight days before Election Day. Photograph: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg *** Local Caption *** Walter Martiniano ORG XMIT: 155112745 ORG XMIT: MJS1210300317539702 Image by Victor J. Blue

  • Waves from Hurricane Sandy crash onto the damaged Avalon Pier in Kill Devil Hills, N.C., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 as Sandy churns up the east coast. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.  (AP Photo/Gerry Broome) ORG XMIT: NCGB119 Image by Gerry Broome

  • One World Trade Center, right, peeks through a light rain as water from the Hudson River creeps up on Pier A Park with the expected arrival of Hurricane Sandy in Hoboken, N.J., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) Image by The Associated Press

  • Leslie Price carries personal items out of her Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) trailer in preparation of Hurricane Sandy on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Schoharie, N.Y. She has lived in the trailer since her home was destroyed from flooding caused by Tropical Storm Irene last year. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Mike Groll) ORG XMIT: NYMG104 Image by Mike Groll

  • Workers staff the state emergency operations center on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 in Waterbury, Vt. Vermont electric utilities are seeing the first scattered power outages as the state braces for the arrival of Hurricane Sandy. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot) ORG XMIT: VTTT102 Image by Toby Talbot

  • Adam Howard, right, works to clean the inside of Bubba's restaurant on the water in Virginia Beach, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy flooded the business at high tide. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) ORG XMIT: VASH112 Image by Steve Helber

  • Ocean waves kick up near homes along Peggoty Beach in Scituate, Mass. Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) ORG XMIT: MAEA101 Image by Elise Amendola

  • Viewers brace against ocean spray as waves crash against a seawall in Scituate, Mass. Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) ORG XMIT: MAEA102 Image by Elise Amendola

  • A National Guard truck checks the area for stranded people as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Ocean City, Del. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) ORG XMIT: MDAB107 Image by Alex Brandon

  • A woman reacts to waves crashing over a seawall in Narragansett, R.I., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.  (AP Photo/Steven Senne) ORG XMIT: RISR101 Image by Steven Senne

  • Ocean waves kick up near homes along Peggoty Beach in Scituate, Mass. Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) ORG XMIT: MAEA101 Image by Elise Amendola

  • Viewers brace against ocean spray as waves crash against a seawall in Scituate, Mass. Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) ORG XMIT: MAEA102 Image by Elise Amendola

  • An Autumn leaf sticks up from a snow covered step on the grounds of Mountain Lake Hotel at an elevation of 4000 feet in Giles County Va. on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. About three inches of snow was measured in a snow gauge at the hotel, the first snow fall of the year, as result of Hurricane Sandy. (AP Photo/The Roanoke Times, Matt Gentry) ORG XMIT: VAROA203 Image by Matt Gentry

  • Adam Howard, right, works to clean the inside of Bubba's restaurant on the water in Virginia Beach, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy flooded the business at high tide. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) ORG XMIT: VASH112 Image by Steve Helber

  • Youngsters run as waves crash against a seawall in Scituate, Mass. Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) ORG XMIT: MAEA104 Image by Elise Amendola

  • After checking to make sure his boat line is secure, Bob Casseday crosses the waist high flooded street just over the bridge along Savannah Road in Lewes, Del., to get back home as Hurricane Sandy hits Delaware, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/The Wilmington News-Journal, Suchat Pederson) NO SALES ORG XMIT: DEWIL101 Image by Suchat Pederson

  • As rain from Hurricane Sandy arrives in Washington, workers haul sandbags to shore up vulnerable spots at The Pavilion at the Old Post Office, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Washington. The Justice Department is seen in the background. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ORG XMIT: DCSA103 Image by J. Scott Applewhite

  • As rain from Hurricane Sandy arrives in Washington, Rick Campbell of Upper Marlboro, Md., reaches for sandbags to shore up vulnerable spots at The Pavilion at the Old Post Office, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. The Justice Department is seen in the background. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ORG XMIT: DCSA104 Image by J. Scott Applewhite

  • Ocean waves kick up near homes along Peggoty Beach in Scituate, Mass. Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) Image by The Associated Press

  • A Dare County utility worker checks on conditions along a flooded Ride Lane in Kitty Hawk, N.C., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome) Image by The Associated Press

  • A traveler on Delta Airlines waits for her flight Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Detroit. Dozens of departing flights have been canceled at Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport as a looming superstorm locks down flights to the East Coast. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel) ORG XMIT: MICR101 Image by Charlie Riedel

  • Madison Maher runs out into the rain and wind while her mother, Susan Sorenson, takes a picture of the rough surf in Sea Bright, N.J., Monday. Image by Associated Press

  • A traveler on Delta Airlines waits for her flight Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Detroit. Dozens of departing flights have been canceled at Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport as a looming superstorm locks down flights to the East Coast. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel) Image by The Associated Press

  • AmeriCares relief workers load supplies onto the aid organization's mobile clinic on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in preparation for Hurricane Sandy. AmeriCares is ready to deliver medicines and relief supplies to emergency shelters and health clinics all across the East Coast. (PRNewsFoto/AmeriCares) ORG XMIT: PRN13

  • Travelers on Delta Airlines look at a departure screen Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Detroit. Dozens of departing flights have been canceled at Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel) ORG XMIT: MICR107 Image by Charlie Riedel

  • Ron Croker, left, and Tim Wood, move a jet ski on wheels to a safer location as water floods the dock, as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Ocean City, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) ORG XMIT: MDAB112 Image by Alex Brandon

  • Storm clouds loom over the Empire State Building and Manhattan skyline, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo) Image by The Associated Press

  • The floor of the New York Stock Exchange is empty of traders, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. All major U.S. stock and options exchanges will remain closed Monday with Hurricane Sandy nearing landfall on the East Coast. Trading has rarely stopped for weather. A blizzard led to a late start and an early close on Jan. 8, 1996, according to the exchange's parent company, NYSE Euronext. The NYSE shut down on Sept. 27, 1985 for Hurricane Gloria. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Image by The Associated Press

  • A downed limb lies in a flooded street as Hurricane Sandy approaches, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Center Moriches, N.Y. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow) Image by The Associated Press

  • A construction crane atop a luxury high-rise dangles precariously over the streets after collapsing in high winds from Hurricane Sandy, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy bore down on the Eastern Seaboard's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds, soaking rain and a surging wall of water up to 11 feet tall. (AP Photo/John Minchillo) Image by The Associated Press

  • People run through a flooded street as Hurricane Sandy approaches, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Lindenhurst, N.Y. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow) Image by The Associated Press

  • Vanessa Pumo walks her dog Bella as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy arrive, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 in Brooklyn, N.Y. Behind her is the Manhattan skyline and Brooklyn Bridge, right. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) Image by The Associated Press

  • Sand bags protect the front of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. There had been plans to allow electronic trading to go forward on the New York Stock Exchange but with a storm surge expected to cover parts of lower Manhattan in water, officials decided late Sunday that it was too risky to ask any personnel to staff the exchanges. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) Image by The Associated Press

  • Lisa Famularo braces for impact as a large wave crashes over a seawall while she photographed heavy surf in the Atlantic Ocean during the early stages of Hurricane in Kennebunk, Maine. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.  Image by Associated Press

  • Viewers brace against ocean spray as waves crash against a seawall in Scituate, Mass. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. Image by Associated Press

  • Rough surf of the Atlantic Ocean breaks over the beach and across Beach Ave. in Cape May, N.J., as high tide and Hurricane Sandy begin to arrive. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. Image by Associated Press

  • A damaged crane hangs over 57th Street after being torn from it's base by high winds in New York. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. Image by Associated Press

  • A FDNY firefighter and a New York police officer look up at a construction crane atop a luxury high-rise dangling precariously over the streets after collapsing in high winds from Hurricane Sandy in New York. Hurricane Sandy bore down on the Eastern Seaboard's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds, soaking rain and a surging wall of water up to 11 feet tall. Image by Associated Press

  • A Rehoboth Beach resident watches waves crash down in Delaware, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing for higher ground, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/The Wilmington News-Journal, Suchat Pederson) NO SALES Image by The Associated Press

  • John Constantine makes his way out of his house after winds from Hurricane Sandy toppled a tree fell onto it in Andover, Mass. Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Winslow Townson) ORG XMIT: MAWT101 Image by Winslow Townson

  • A row of houses stands in floodwaters at Grassy Sound in North Wildwood, N.J., as Hurricane Sandy pounds the East Coast Monday Oct. 29, 2012. The powerful storm made the westward lurch and took dead aim at New Jersey and Delaware on Monday, washing away part of the Atlantic City boardwalk, putting the presidential campaign on hold and threatening to cripple Wall Street and the New York subway system with an epic surge of seawater. (AP Photo/The Press of Atlantic City, Dale Gerhard) MANDATORY CREDIT ORG XMIT: NJATL102 Image by Dale Gerhard

  • People wade and paddle down a flooded street as Hurricane Sandy approaches, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Lindenhurst, N.Y. Gaining speed and power through the day, the storm knocked out electricity to more than 1 million people and figured to upend life for tens of millions more. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow) ORG XMIT: NYJD207 Image by Jason DeCrow

  • Michael Wirtz, of Wilmington, Del., braves flood waters and high winds that arrive with Hurricane Sandy along North Michigan Avenue in Atlantic City, N.J., Monday Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing for higher ground, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/The Press of Atlantic City, Michael Ein) MANDATORY CREDIT ORG XMIT: NJATL104 Image by Michael Ein

  • An historic ferry boat named the Binghamton is swamped by the waves of the Hudson River in Edgewater, N.J., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as Hurricane Sandy lashes the East Coast. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle) ORG XMIT: NJCR110 Image by Craig Ruttle

  • Lisa Famularo and her husband, Michael Green, prepare to get slammed by a large wave while making pictures of heavy surf in the Atlantic Ocean during the early stages of Hurricane Sandy, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Kennebunk, Maine. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty) ORG XMIT: MERB103 Image by Robert F. Bukaty

  • Ocean waves kick up near homes along Peggoty Beach in Scituate, Mass. Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) ORG XMIT: MAEA101 Image by Elise Amendola

  • ADDS INFORMATION ON BUILDINGS AND LOCATION - Lower Manhattan goes dark during superstorm Sandy, on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as seen from the Brooklyn Heights promenade in the Brooklyn borough of New York. One World Trade Center, background center, remains brightly lit. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.  (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews) ORG XMIT: NYBM106 Image by Bebeto Matthews

  • ADDS INFORMATION ON BUILDINGS AND LOCATION - Lower Manhattan goes dark during superstorm Sandy, on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as seen from the Brooklyn Heights promenade in the Brooklyn borough of New York. One World Trade Center, center, remains brightly lit. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.  (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews) ORG XMIT: NYBM105 Image by Bebeto Matthews

  • ADDS INFORMATION ON BUILDINGS AND LOCATION - Lower Manhattan goes dark during superstorm Sandy, on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as seen from the Brooklyn Heights promenade in the Brooklyn borough of New York. One World Trade Center, background center, remains brightly lit. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.  (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews) ORG XMIT: NYBM106 Image by Bebeto Matthews

  • Streets are flooded under the Manhattan Bridge in the Dumbo section of Brooklyn, N.Y., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews) ORG XMIT: NYBM111 Image by Bebeto Matthews

  • Sea water floods the Ground Zero construction site, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.  (AP Photo/ John Minchillo) ORG XMIT: NYJM127 Image by John Minchillo

  • Sea water floods the entrance to the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.  (AP Photo/ John Minchillo) ORG XMIT: NYJM125 Image by John Minchillo

  • A car is submerged in the Dumbo section of the Brooklyn borough of New York, as the East River overflows during hurricane Sandy, on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Authorities warned that New York City and Long Island could get the worst of the storm surge: an 11-foot onslaught of seawater that could swamp lower areas of the city. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews) ORG XMIT: NYBM108 ORG XMIT: MJS1210292014239399 Image by Bebeto Matthews

  • This photo provided by 6abc Action News shows the Inlet section of Atlantic City, N.J., as Hurricane Sandy makes it approach, Monday Oct. 29, 2012. Sandy made landfall at 8 p.m. near Atlantic City, which was already mostly under water and saw a piece of its world-famous Boardwalk washed away earlier in the day. (AP Photo/6abc Action News, Dann Cuellar) ORG XMIT: NY117 Image by Dann Cuellar

  • The U.S. Capitol and Pennsylvania Avenue are seen Monday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, as heavy rain from Hurricane Sandy arrives in Washington. Sandy strengthened before dawn and is on a predicted path toward Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York putting it on a collision course with two other weather systems that would create a superstorm. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) Image by The Associated Press

  • People brave high winds and blowing sand as they walk on Steeplechase Pier at Coney Island in the Brooklyn borough of New York as Hurricane Sandy arrives, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) Image by The Associated Press

  • A stranded car sits parked along a street near downtown Norfolk, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy are hitting the area. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) Image by The Associated Press

  • A row of houses stands in floodwaters at Grassy Sound in North Wildwood, N.J., as Hurricane Sandy pounds the East Coast Monday Oct. 29, 2012. The powerful storm made the westward lurch and took dead aim at New Jersey and Delaware on Monday, washing away part of the Atlantic City boardwalk, putting the presidential campaign on hold and threatening to cripple Wall Street and the New York subway system with an epic surge of seawater. (AP Photo/The Press of Atlantic City, Dale Gerhard) MANDATORY CREDIT Image by The Associated Press

  • Snow coats Highway 33 West in West Virginia as Hurricane Sandy batters the eastern seaboard, and a cold weather system blankets most of the high elevations in West Virginia on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. As the systems meet, blizzard conditions are in effect across multiple counties in West Virginia, Virginia and Pennsylvania. (AP Photo/Robert Ray) Image by The Associated Press

  • Sand bags protect an entrance of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. There had been plans to allow electronic trading to go forward on the New York Stock Exchange but with a storm surge expected to cover parts of lower Manhattan in water, officials decided late Sunday that it was too risky to ask any personnel to staff the exchanges. (AP Photo/Richard Drew) ORG XMIT: NYRD104 Image by Richard Drew

  • A pedestrian walks her dog through a working crew as they stack sandbags beside concrete barriers to protect buildings near the World Financial Center in anticipation of massive flooding, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy bore down on the Eastern Seaboard's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds, soaking rain and a seawater surge of anywhere from 6 to 11 feet. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo) ORG XMIT: NYJM104 Image by John Minchillo

  • Vanessa Pumo walks her dog Bella as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy arrive, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 in Brooklyn, N.Y. Behind her is the Manhattan skyline and Brooklyn Bridge, right. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) ORG XMIT: NYML102 Image by Mark Lennihan

  • A Norfolk resident chains his bike and heads to work in floodwaters near downtown in Norfolk, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy are hitting the area. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) ORG XMIT: VASH101 Image by Steve Helber

  • Norfolk resident Jack Devnew looks at the water covering a dock as he checks on his boat at a marina near downtown Norfolk, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy are hitting the area. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) ORG XMIT: VASH104 Image by Steve Helber

  • Workers stack sandbags beside concrete barriers to protect buildings near the World Financial Center in anticipation of flooding, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy bore down on the Eastern Seaboard's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds, soaking rain and a seawater surge of anywhere from 6 to 11 feet. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo) ORG XMIT: NYJM103 Image by Associated Press

  • A stranded car sits parked along a street near downtown Norfolk, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy are hitting the area. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) Image by The Associated Press

  • Richard Thomas walks through the flood waters in front of his home after assisting neighbors as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Fenwick Island, Del. Forecasters warned that the New York City region could face the worst of Hurricane Sandy as it bore down on the U.S. East Coast's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of financial markets and mass transit, sending coastal residents fleeing and threatening high winds, rain and a wall of water up to 11 feet (3.35 meters) tall. It could endanger up to 50 million people for days. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) ORG XMIT: DEAB101 Image by Alex Brandon

  • Storm clouds loom over the Empire State Building and Manhattan skyline, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo) ORG XMIT: NYJM106 Image by John Minchillo

  • Lamar Chambers watches waves as winds from hurricane Sandy reach Seaside Park in Bridgeport, Conn., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill) ORG XMIT: CTJH101 Image by Jessica Hill

  • FILE - In this Oct. 12, 2012 file photo wind turbines produce green energy in Nauen near Berlin, Germany. Stephan Kohler, who heads the government-affiliated agency overseeing Germany's electricity grid, said Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, the current strong expansion of wind, solar and other renewable power sources will easily top the official target of 35 percent by 2022. (AP Photo/Ferdinand Ostrop, File) Image by The Associated Press

  • Life long Cape May resident Andy Becica watches rough surf pound the beach Monday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., as high tide and Hurricane Sandy begin to arrive. Becica said this was the worst he's seen the ocean. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Mel Evans) ORG XMIT: NJME109 Image by Mel Evans

  • A woman carries bags back to her car after visiting a grocery store that is open for business despite being boarded up in advance of superstorm Sandy, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Sayville, N.Y. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.  (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow) ORG XMIT: NYJD101 Image by Jason DeCrow

  • Oswaldo Falleres puts tape on the window of a restaurant in preparation for the arrival of superstorm Sandy, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, in Hoboken, N.J. Tens of thousands of people were ordered to evacuate coastal areas Sunday as big cities and small towns across the U.S. Northeast braced for the onslaught of a superstorm threatening some 60 million people along the most heavily populated corridor in the nation. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) Image by The Associated Press

  • People venture out during the strong winds and high surf of the Atlantic Ocean before the arrival of Hurricane Sandy on Sunday, Oct., 28, 2012, in Long Beach, N.Y. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek) Image by The Associated Press

  • Utilities and state road workers monitor the situation on Virginia Dare Trail as rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy engulf the beachfront road in Kill Devil Hills, N.C., Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012. Tens of thousands of people were ordered to evacuate coastal areas Sunday as big cities and small towns across the U.S. Northeast braced for the onslaught of a superstorm threatening some 60 million people along the most heavily populated corridor in the nation. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome) Image by The Associated Press

  • This NOAA satellite image taken Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012 shows Hurricane Sandy off the Mid Atlantic coastline moving toward the north with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph. Tens of thousands of people were ordered to evacuate coastal areas Sunday as big cities and small towns across the U.S. Northeast braced for the onslaught of a superstorm threatening some 60 million people along the most heavily populated corridor in the nation. (AP Photo/Weather Underground) Image by The Associated Press

  • Multiple agencies work in preparation for Hurricane Sandy at the Virginia Emergency Operations Center in Chesterfield County Va. Image by Richmond Times-Dispatch

  • Jessica Ospina, left, and Allison Kane of Virginia Beach, Va., lean into the strong wind and rain off the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge tunnel in Virginia Beach, as Hurricane Sandy works its way north, battering the U.S. East Coast. Image by The Virginian-Pilot

  • Michael Bolick works on the roof of his friend Chris Villarreal's house in Sunset Park, N.C. Forecasters say Hurricane Sandy is a couple of hundred miles off the North Carolina coast and the center of the storm is expected to be near the mid-Atlantic coast on Monday night. The National Hurricane Center said Sunday afternoon that the storm has winds of 75 mph. Hurricane-force winds extend up to 175 miles from the storm's center. Image by The Star-News

  • Shena Morris, left, stands with her son Lydonn Hickman, 11, center, while they wait for a subway train as they prepare to leave the Coney Island section of New York. Morris stated she was going to stay at her mother's home in another part of New York as Coney Island and other New York City neighborhoods were under the mandatory evacuation order as the city braced for the arrival of Hurricane Sandy and a possible flooding storm surge. Image by Associated Press

  • Passengers depart one of the last ferries from the Fire Island communities in preparation for the arrival of Hurricane Sandy in Bay Shore, N.Y. Image by Associated Press

  • A boarded up beachfront home in Margate N.J. is repainted for a new hurricane threat as Hurricane Sandy approaches the area, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012. (AP Photo/Joseph Kaczmarek) ORG XMIT: NJJK109 Image by Joseph Kaczmarek

  • Passengers depart one of the last ferries from the Fire Island communities in preparation for the arrival of Hurricane Sandy in Bay Shore, N.Y. Image by Associated Press

  • High winds blow sea foam onto Jeanette's Pier in Nags Head, N.C. as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy move into the area. Governors from North Carolina, where steady rains were whipped by gusting winds Saturday night, to Connecticut declared states of emergency. Delaware ordered mandatory evacuations for coastal communities by 8 p.m. Sunday. Image by Associated Press

  • A car goes through the high water as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, in Ocean City, Md. Governors from North Carolina, where steady rains were whipped by gusting winds Saturday night, to Connecticut declared states of emergency. Delaware ordered mandatory evacuations for coastal communities by 8 p.m. Sunday. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) Image by The Associated Press

  • In this image taken Sunday, Hurricane Sandy is seen on the East Coast of the United States. Sandy weakened briefly to a tropical storm Saturday but was soon back up to Category 1 strength, packing 75 mph winds. Image by NOAA's GOES East / Associated Press

  • A police officer sets up a road block on South Oregon Inlet Road as water from Hurricane Sandy covers the road in Nags Head, N.C., on Sunday. Image by Associated Press

  • Jenny Lind and her dog, Greta, run away from a wave that comes up the beach in Ocean City, Md., as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast. Image by Associated Press

  • Ocean water rolls over NC 12 at the north end of Buxton, N.C., at dawn Sunday. Waves from offshore Hurricane Sandy are battering Hatteras Island. Image by Associated Press

  • Mike Strobel loads sand bags for his business, Mike's Carpet Connection, as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast on Sunday in Fenwick Island, Del. Tens of thousands of people were ordered to evacuate coastal areas Sunday as big cities and small towns across the Northeast braced for the onslaught of a superstorm threatening some 60 million people. Image by Associated Press

  • A sign informs subway riders of changes in service in the hours before the arrival of Hurricane Sandy in New York Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012. Areas in the Northeast Region prepared Sunday for the arrival of the hurricane and a possible flooding storm surge. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle) Image by The Associated Press

  • High winds blow sea foam into the air as a person walks across Jeanette's Pier in Nags Head, N.C., on Sunday as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy move into the area. Image by Associated Press

  • Mike Strobel loads sand bags for his business, Mike's Carpet Connection, as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast, Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, in Fenwick Island, Del. Tens of thousands of people were ordered to evacuate coastal areas Sunday as big cities and small towns across the U.S. Northeast braced for the onslaught of a superstorm threatening some 60 million people along the most heavily populated corridor in the nation. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon) Image by The Associated Press

  • High winds blow sea foam onto Jeanette's Pier in Nags Head, N.C., Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012 as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy move into the area. Governors from North Carolina, where steady rains were whipped by gusting winds Saturday night, to Connecticut declared states of emergency. Delaware ordered mandatory evacuations for coastal communities by 8 p.m. Sunday. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome) ORG XMIT: NCGB103 Image by Gerry Broome

  • Waves pound Carolina Beach pier in Carolina Beach, N.C., Saturday, Oct 27, 2012 as Hurricane Sandy churns in the Atlantic Ocean. Hurricane Sandy, upgraded again Saturday just hours after forecasters said it had weakened to a tropical storm, was barreling north from the Caribbean and was expected to make landfall early Tuesday near the Delaware coast, then hit two winter weather systems as it moves inland, creating a hybrid monster storm. (AP Photo/The Star-News, Ken Blevins) ORG XMIT: NCWSN101 Image by Ken Blevins

  • Large waves generated by Hurricane Sandy crash into Jeanette's Pier in Nags Head, N.C., Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012 as the storm moves up the east coast. Hurricane Sandy, upgraded again Saturday just hours after forecasters said it had weakened to a tropical storm, was barreling north from the Caribbean and was expected to make landfall early Tuesday near the Delaware coast, then hit two winter weather systems as it moves inland, creating a hybrid monster storm. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome) Image by The Associated Press

  • Surf store workers Fletcher Birch, left, and Jay Kleman board up the windows of the store in Ocean City, Md. on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012 as Hurricane Sandy approaches the Atlantic coast. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) Image by The Associated Press

  • A surfer kicks out at the top of a wave after a ride, Saturday Oct. 27, 2012 in Jacksonville, Fla. Hurricane Sandy, upgraded again Saturday just hours after forecasters said it had weakened to a tropical storm, was barreling north from the Caribbean and was expected to make landfall early Tuesday near the Delaware coast, then hit two winter weather systems as it moves inland, creating a hybrid monster storm. (AP Photo/The Florida Times-Union, Bob Mack) Image by The Associated Press

  • People walk the beach near Bally's Atlantic City in front of a rough ocean, Saturday October 27 2012 in Atlantic City, N.J. With Hurricane Sandy taking aim at New Jersey, Gov. Chris Christie ordered Atlantic City's 12 casinos to shut down at 4 p.m. Sunday as part of his statewide emergency declaration. (AP Photo/The Press of Atlantic City, Ben Fogletto) MANDATORY CREDIT Image by The Associated Press

  • A worker boards up the windows of the store as Hurricane Sandy approaches in Ocean City, Md., on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012. Hurricane Sandy upgraded again Saturday just hours after forecasters said it had weakened to a tropical storm was barreling north from the Caribbean and was expected to make landfall early Tuesday near the Delaware coast, then hit two winter weather systems as it moves inland, creating a hybrid monster storm. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) Image by The Associated Press

  • Beach goers watch waves generated by Hurricane Sandy along a breezy Coligny Beach Park on Hilton Head Island, S.C., Saturday morning, Oct. 27, 2012. Hurricane Sandy _ upgraded again Saturday just hours after forecasters said it had weakened to a tropical storm _ was barreling north from the Caribbean and was expected to make landfall early Tuesday near the Delaware coast, then hit two winter weather systems as it moves inland, creating a hybrid monster storm. (AP Photo/The Island Packet, Jay Karr) Image by The Associated Press

  • Store manager L.P. Cyburt, right, gets help boarding up the windows of the business as Hurricane Sandy approaches the Atlantic Coast, in Ocean City, Md., on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2012. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana) Image by The Associated Press

  • As Hurricane Sandy moves up the East Coast, owners remove their boats from the water at the Atlantic Highlands Marina, Friday Oct. 26, 2012 in Atlantic Highlands, N.J. When Hurricane Sandy becomes a hybrid weather monster some call "Frankenstorm" it will smack the East Coast harder and wider than last year's damaging Irene, forecasters said Friday. (AP Photo/Joe Epstein) Image by The Associated Press

  • Waves wash over the seawall near high tide at Battery Park in New York, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as Hurricane Sandy approaches the East Coast. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle) ORG XMIT: NYCR101 Image by Craig Ruttle

  • Southport Marina in Kenosha Image by Richard Nelson

  • Southport Marina in Kenosha Image by Richard Nelson

  • Southport Marina in Kenosha Image by Richard Nelson

  • Southport Marina in Kenosha Image by Richard Nelson

  • Southport Marina in Kenosha Image by Richard Nelson

  • Southport Marina in Kenosha Image by Richard Nelson

  • This aerial photo shows burned-out homes in the Breezy Point section of the Queens borough New York after a fire. The tiny beachfront neighborhood told to evacuate before Sandy hit New York burned down as it was inundated by floodwaters, transforming a quaint corner of the Rockaways into a smoke-filled debris field. Image by Associated Press

  • Port Washington waves Image by Kimberly Buchanan

  • Port Washington waves Image by Kimberly Buchanan

  • Port Washington waves Image by Kimberly Buchanan

  • Port Washington waves Image by Kimberly Buchanan

  • Port Washington waves Image by Kimberly Buchanan

  • Lake Michigan. | Photo: Michael Greene

How is Hurricane Sandy affecting you or someone you know - especially from Southeastern Wisconsin?  Comment below with your/their experience.

Click here for a photo gallery of Hurricane Sandy

10:05 p.m

People living in Milwaukee, including Marquette University junior Elise Angelopulos, with family and friends living on the East Coast are worried about family back home.

10:02 p.m

Warnings are being issued along the lakefront in Milwaukee County.  The message from rescue crews: The best way to stay safe, is to stay away.

8:56 p.m.

Superstorm Sandy is keeping President Obama from making a campaign stop in Green Bay Tuesday.  Also, Mitt Romney canceled his event at State Fair Park Monday due to the storm along the East Coast.

8:25 p.m

Port of Milwaukee officials are taking steps to avoid damage to boats and docks following reports of high waves and strong wind gusts along Lake Michigan

8:05 p.m.

Kenosha County's sheriff is urging some to leave their homes due to possible flooding.

6:32 p.m

Stripped of hurricane status but every bit as dangerous, the weather monster known as Sandy wheeled toward the New Jersey and Delaware coast Monday after washing away part of the Atlantic City boardwalk, putting the presidential campaign on hold and threatening to cripple Wall Street and the New York subway system with an epic surge of seawater.

Just before it was expected to blow ashore in the evening, the National Hurricane Center announced that it considered Sandy no longer a hurricane but a wintry hybrid known as a post-tropical storm.

The decision was technical and based on the storm's shape and its mix of cold and warm temperatures -- a distinction that meant more to meteorologists than the 50 million people still in peril.  The storm's top sustained winds weakened only slightly, to 85 mph from 90.

6:22 p.m.

While the East Coast is getting hammered by post-tropical storm Sandy, Wisconsin-based Generac is getting flooded with calls and orders for back-up generators to help soften the blow left behind by Sandy

5:02 p.m.

TODAY'S TMJ4's Annie Scholz says officials tell her that waves along Lake Michigan could reach as high as 40 feet Tuesday.

Milwaukee Police Captain Steve Basting says they will have limited resources to help people along the lakefront tomorrow.

"These are lake conditions we haven't seen for many many years," says Basting.  "Please stay home."

4:20 p.m

TODAY'S TMJ4 talked with Baltimore, Maryland resident Lauren Varnas about conditions on the East Coast during Hurricane Sandy.  Click here to watch.

4:12 p.m.

Ahead of Hurricane Sandy, Washington D.C. residents are being told to stay inside. TODAY'S TMJ4 talked with a Marquette alum, who now lives in Washington D.C.  Click here to watch that interview.

3:46 p.m.

With waves expected to reach as high as 33 feet Tuesday on Lake Michigan, the Port of Milwaukee is taking steps to protect its docks and boats.  The superstorm bearing down on the East Coast is expected to create dangerous conditions on the Great Lakes.  The National Weather Service issued gale and storm warnings for the lakes through Wednesday.

3:44 p.m.

Madison-based Alliant Energy is sending more than 100 people to the East Coast to help with Hurricane Sandy's aftermath.

3:33 p.m

Governor Walker says the Wisconsin National Guard is ready to help with relief efforts following Hurricane Sandy.

12:31 p.m.
Melissa McCrady of TODAY'S TMJ4 talked with two Sandy-stranded travelers, one in Milwaukee, one in New York.

11:47 a.m.
Mitt Romney has become the second Presidential candidate to cancel a campaign appearance.  He was going to speak in West Allis tonight, but he will not due to Hurricane Sandy.

9:05 a.m.
The effects of Sandy are so prevalent that President Obama's campaign has canceled his trip to Green Bay on Tuesday.

8:49 a.m.
Below, we mentioned that Hurricane Sandy could bring 33 foot waves to Lake Michigan.  Storm Team 4Caster Scott Steele says waves THAT high won't reach Milwaukee.  

But, he says, 17-foot waves are possible along the coast of the Brew City.

7:42 a.m.
What will Hurricane Sandy's effect be on Lake Michigan's levels?  It could bring 33 foot waves.  Click here for more info.

7:22 a.m.
One of WTMJ's own barely got out of New York City before the storm. 

"Last plane that left LaGuardia," said WTMJ's Johnathan Woodward, who made that plane.  He works for both our radio and TV news teams.

Click here for more of his story.

6:12 a.m.
On our Facebook page, TODAY'S TMJ4 viewer Diane Habermann tells us the story of what many people are enduring due to Sandy:

"Have friends vacationing with another friend that lives in New Hampshire they were suppose to come home today but their stuck out there now for at least 3-4 more days!!?? Praying for all affected!!"

6:00 a.m.
WTMJ's own Johnathan Woodward tells us he's gone on a rather roundabout way from New York to Milwaukee - Fort Lauderdale.  He's one of many from our area who have had to take a rather indirect method to get back.

Who do you know who has had to find another way to get home to Southeastern Wisconsin?  Comment below!

Storm Team 4Caster Scott Steele explains the path of the storm in our video to the left.  Check it out!

5:00 a.m.
NEW YORK - Hurricane Sandy bore down on the Eastern Seaboard's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing for higher ground, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds, soaking rain and a surging wall of water up to 11 feet tall.

Sandy stayed on a predicted path that could take it over Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York on its way to a collision course with two other weather systems, creating a superstorm with the potential for havoc over 800 miles from the East Coast to the Great Lakes. About 2 to 3 feet of snow were even forecast for mountainous parts of West Virginia.

The tempest could endanger up to 50 million people for days.

Many workers planned to stay home Monday as subways, buses and trains shut down across the region under the threat of flooding that could inundate tracks and tunnels.

Airports also closed, causing lots of cancellations for airline fliers including those at Mitchell International Airport.

As of 4:50 a.m., airlines canceled 24 departures from Mitchell between then and 4:20 p.m.

Click the links below for:
- Mitchell International departures
- Mitchell International arrivals
- Airline waivers

Authorities warned that the time for evacuation was running out or already past. Utilities brought in extra crews in anticipation of widespread power failures.

The center of the storm was positioned to come ashore Monday night in New Jersey, meaning the worst of the surge could be in the northern part of that state and in New York City and on Long Island. Higher tides brought by a full moon compounded the threat to the metropolitan area of about 20 million people.

"This is the worst-case scenario," said Louis Uccellini, environmental prediction chief for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

As rain from the leading edges began to fall over the Northeast on Sunday, hundreds of thousands of people from Maryland to Connecticut were ordered to leave low-lying coastal areas, including 375,000 in lower Manhattan and other parts of New York City, 50,000 in Delaware and 30,000 in Atlantic City, N.J., where the city's 12 casinos shut down for only the fourth time ever.

"I think this one's going to do us in," said Mark Palazzolo, who boarded up his bait-and-tackle shop in Point Pleasant Beach, N.J., with the same wood he used in past storms, crossing out the names of Hurricanes Isaac and Irene and spray-painting "Sandy" next to them. "I got a call from a friend of mine from Florida last night who said, `Mark, get out! If it's not the storm, it'll be the aftermath. People are going to be fighting in the streets over gasoline and food."'

President Barack Obama declared emergencies in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, authorizing federal relief work to begin well ahead of time. He promised the government would "respond big and respond fast" after the storm hits.

"My message to the governors as well as to the mayors is anything they need, we will be there, and we will cut through red tape," Obama said. "We are not going to get bogged down with a lot of rules."

Authorities warned that New York could get hit with a surge of seawater that could swamp parts of lower Manhattan, flood subway tunnels and cripple the network of electrical and communications lines that are vital to the nation's financial center.

Major U.S. financial markets, including the New York Stock Exchange, Nasdaq and CME Group in Chicago, planned a rare shutdown Monday. The NYSE shut down on Sept. 27, 1985, for Hurricane Gloria. The United Nations also shut down and canceled all meetings at its New York headquarters.

New York called off school Monday for the city's 1.1 million students and announced it would suspend all train, bus and subway service Sunday night. More than 5 million riders a day depend on the transit system.

"If you don't evacuate, you are not only endangering your life, you are also endangering the lives of the first responders who are going in to rescue you," Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned. "This is a serious and dangerous storm."

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was typically blunt: "Don't be stupid. Get out."

Wary of being seen as putting their political pursuits ahead of public safety, Obama and Republican nominee Mitt Romney reshuffled campaign plans as the storm approached.

In Virginia, one of the most competitive states, election officials eased absentee voting requirements for those affected by the storm. Early voting was canceled Monday in Maryland and the District of Columbia.

Sandy, a Category 1 hurricane with sustained winds of 75 mph, was blamed for 65 deaths in the Caribbean before it began traveling northward, parallel to the Eastern Seaboard. As of 2 a.m. Monday, it was centered about 425 miles southeast of New York City, moving to the north at 14 mph, with hurricane-force winds extending an unusual 175 miles from its center.

Gale-force winds blew overnight over coastal North Carolina, southeastern Virginia, the Delmarva Peninsula and coastal New Jersey.

Sandy was expected to hook inland Monday, colliding with a wintry storm moving in from the west and cold air streaming down from the Arctic, and then cut across into Pennsylvania and travel up through New York state.

Forecasters said the combination could bring close to a foot of rain in places, a potentially lethal storm surge of 4 to 11 feet across much of the region, and punishing winds that could cause widespread power outages that last for days. The storm could also dump up to 2 feet of snow in Kentucky, North Carolina and West Virginia.

Airlines canceled nearly 7,500 flights and Amtrak began suspending train service across the Northeast. New York, Philadelphia, Washington and Baltimore moved to shut down their subways, buses and trains. Those cities shut down their schools, as did Boston. Non-essential government offices closed in the nation's capital.

Pennsylvania's largest utilities brought in hundreds of line and tree-trimming crews in anticipation of several days of power failures or intentional shutdowns in areas with heavy flooding.

In New Jersey, where utilities were widely criticized last year for slow responses after the remnants of storms Irene and Lee, authorities promised a better performance. Bob Hanna, president of the state's Board of Public Utilities, noted that this storm has the potential to threaten even large transmission lines.

Nearly 100 miles off the coast of Cape Hatteras, N.C., a replica of the tall ship made famous in the film "Munity on the Bounty" was taking on water and without propulsion with 17 people aboard. The Coast Guard was monitoring the situation early Monday.

On Monday evening in Rehoboth, Del., only a few cars rolled along Route 1, an artery that is often bumper-to-bumper in summer.

"We were told to get the heck out. I was going to stay, but it's better to be safe than sorry," said Hugh Phillips, who was one of the first in line when a Red Cross shelter opened Sunday afternoon in neighboring Lewes.

Despite the dire warnings, some souls refused to budge.

Jonas Clark of Manchester Township, N.J. -- right in Sandy's projected path -- stood outside a convenience store, calmly sipping a coffee and wondering why people were working themselves "into a tizzy."

"I've seen a lot of major storms in my time, and there's nothing you can do but take reasonable precautions and ride out things the best you can," said Clark, 73.

The storm threatened to drop inches of rain on some areas still recovering from last year's deluges.

In Pompton Lakes, N.J., where record flooding inundated homes a year ago, some residents were already putting belongings out near the curb in advance of the storm.

"They're figuring, divide and conquer," said resident Kevin Gogots. "They'll take the stuff they want to save and put the rest out. Of course, if the street floods again, we'll just have things floating around."

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Breed reported from Raleigh, N.C.; Contributing to this report were AP Science Writer Seth Borenstein in Washington; Katie Zezima in Atlantic City, N.J.; David Porter in Pompton Lakes, N.J.; Wayne Parry in Point Pleasant Beach, N.J.; and David Dishneau in Delaware.