Clintonville bangs, booms remain a mystery

CREATED Mar. 19, 2012 - UPDATED: Mar. 19, 2012

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  • Todd Hicks reports Video by wtmj.com

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CLINTONVILLE - Authorities in Clintonville are trying to find out the cause of several bangs and booms from Sunday and Monday morning.

Many people city said that they have experienced homes and household objects rattling.

Reports came in as early as 9:30 a.m. Sunday night and have been coming as late as about 7:45 a.m. Monday morning.

"Lamps in their houses are kind of shaking.  It makes their dishes rattle.  It makes their windows rattle.  People can hear it inside factories," said Clintonville City Administrator Lisa Kuss told Newsradio 620 WTMJ Monday morning after a large number of calls came in to police between 1:45 and 3:00 a.m. Monday.  "Clearly, not that it's an earthquake, but it almost sounds like people are describing that sort of a feeling, where the earth actually vibrates and things inside their house vibrate."

Kuss confirmed to Newsradio 620 WTMJ Monday afternoon there were no elevated levels of gas located in their pipes, which authorities believed to be the most obvious cause of the shaking.

Kuss said they are looking at these noises from a scientific standpoint.  She said authorities are "trying to determine if there is some sort of earth shifting underground, causing this."

She diffused theories that dynamite may be the cause of the noises.  Kuss said the city of Clintonville has talked to authorities in Waupaca County and surrounding counties and found that no explosive permits have been issued.  She didn't believe it would have been a prank, considering the explosions happened for over 12 hours.

TODAY'S TMJ4 reports that experts at UW-Madison say descriptions of the ground shaking in Clintonville are not usually related to earthquake activity, but seismic monitors in Shiocton, Wis. recorded seismic activity and ground shaking.

Despite all the noises, there have been no reports of injuries or structural damage to homes or buildings.

'We have emergency and utility crews out, since then, monitoring things from water systems, sanitary and storm systems," said Kuss.  "We have monitors for gas levels and manholes which have all come up with no gas levels to be concerned about."

She said most of the reports came from the city's northeast side.

Authorities are even checking into the possibility of some sort of earthquake.

"We plan to get down with Madison to see if there's anything happening geologically."

However, UW-Milwaukee seismologist Keith Sverdup told Newsradio 620 WTMJ that they found no readings on their seismograph.

"It wouldn't surprise me if it remained a mystery."