Van Hollen not participating in Walker staff probe

CREATED Sep. 21, 2011 - UPDATED: Sep. 21, 2011

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  • Tom Murray reports Video by wtmj.com

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MILWAUKEE - Milwaukee County District Attorney John Chisholm, a Democrat, and Republican Attorney General JB Van Hollen have cooperated in the past.

But, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is now reporting that Van Hollen's office refused to assist the DA in a secret John Doe investigation into then County Executive Scott Walker's staff.

Just last week, at the district attorney's request, the FBI seized computers from the Madison home of Walker aide Cindy Archer.

"I don't think I've done anything wrong," Archer told WISC-TV.
 
The Democratic Party of Wisconsin is accusing the Van Hollen of bias.
 
"Maybe there is a perfect explanation for this," said party spokesperson Graeme Zielinski. "But, I think JB VanHollen, as the top cop in Wisconsin, should be above any question.  There shouldn't even be a hint of partisan favor."
 
The party posted a YouTube video said to be Van Hollen at an event leading up the 2010 election.
 
"We have used the Department of Justice the way the Department of Justice is supposed to be used," Van Hollen said in the video. "But, ladies and gentlemen, I can do so much more if you send Scott Walker to Madison."
 
In an email, a Department of Justice spokesperson said "the AG's office functions as a neutral law enforcement agency."
 
The district attorney's office maintains they have "a good working relationship with the attorney general's office."
 
By law, no one involved in the John Doe investigation is allowed to speak publicly about their involvement.
 
"This is an investigation that involves political figures and, theoretically, people who are close to the top," said Julius Kim, a lawyer in private practice, who previously worked in the Milwaukee County District Attorney's office.
 
Van Hollen told a Madison television station that the DOJ mutually agreed with Milwaukee prosecutors that state investigators should not participate and political affiliations were not a factor, according to the Associated Press.