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President Obama rallies support at UW-Madison

CREATED Oct 4, 2012 - UPDATED: Oct 4, 2012

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  • President Obama took the stage around 3:41 p.m. Thursday Image by Staff

  • Obama's visit to Madison comes less than 24 hours after his debate against Republican challenger Mitt Romney in Denver Image by wtmj.com

  • Around 30,000 people gathered on Bascom Hill to see the President speak Image by wtmj.com

  • President Obama slammed his Republican opponent Mitt Romney during his speech Image by wtmj.com

  • Obama stressed the importance of education during his speech Image by wtmj.com

  • Obama talked about the need for less dependence on foreign oil  Image by wtmj.com

  • Obama thanked everyone for their support Image by wtmj.com

MADISON - One of President Barack Obama's first stops after the first presidential debate is Wisconsin.

Mr. Obama spoke to around 30,000 supporters on Bascom Hill at the University of Wisconsin campus Thursday afternoon.  Obama slammed his Republican challenger Mitt Romney following their debate Wednesday night in Denver.

"I met this very spirited fellow who claimed to be Mitt Romney (last night)," says Obama.  "The real Mitt Romney has been running around the country for the last year promising $5 trillion in tax cuts that favor the wealthy, and yet the fellow on the stage last night who looked like Mitt Romney said he didn't know anything about that."

President Obama urged students to vote early when early voting starts on October 22.

"There is something you have to do before (your Halloween celebration) Madison, you have to vote."

Enthusiasm was high among many to see the President.  A huge line of students gathered, and some of them told TODAY'S TMJ4's Nick Montes that they wouldn't miss the historic moment.

"I was really excited (that he's coming)," said sophomore Roxanne Muier.  "I was really excited at a chance to see him in person."

She considers herself a moderate, but told Montes that she backs Mr. Obama.

"What swayed me to his side is his stance on social issues.  That was so closely related to the things I care about."

Some students wanted to hear more about his plans for education and student loans.

"He wants to help us get through, and I think education is really important to him, especially providing equal opportunity for everyone," said freshman Carleigh Shur.

Even some Romney supporters on campus wanted to see the President's speech.

"He's the leader of our country, and whether I agree with how he runs him or not, we've elected him as the leader, so I'm here to see what he has to say."

A group of UW professors, however, were upset that attendance at the Obama rally required registration.

Some political experts claim that the President's appearance in Madison after his first debate with Republican challenger Mitt Romney could be an indication that he feels he could be losing the state.

That, despite the recent Marquette poll (which finished three days before Wednesday's debate) having Mr. Obama owning a 53 to 42 lead on Mr. Romney.

A new CNN poll shows 67 percent of registered voters think Mr. Romney won the debate.

This marks the sixth trip to Wisconsin for the Obama campaign in the last month and a half, and the President's second trip here in less than two weeks.