skip to nav skip to content

  • (2) | COMMENTS
  • Print

 

     Cool, but not crisp.

     That's what Tuesday morning felt like as I headed for the mailbox to pick up the paper and start my final day of vacation.    There's plenty of summer left (and another week-long siesta awaiting me in September) but the a.m. air suggests that autumn is on the way. 

      Nothing drove that point home more than what happened Monday morning as we moved my son into his Marquette dorm room.   It felt as if just a week had passed since we did the ritual in reverse last May, hauling crap out of his old digs as his freshman year came to an end.   Class starts next week, as does the empty nest.   

      As for the 7 days  just passed, my wife and I were able to survive the rigors of her rummage sale, our marriage intact.     We also stayed together through joint car travel and the hanging of wallpaper during the course of our 27 years together, which tells me that we will be as one through our final breaths, having survived all of the major tests a relationship can endure.

      I gained a remodeled man-cave bathroom over vacation, but lost a birch tree in the front yard (my wife loves greenery but wants trees where SHE wants them, not where God randomly placed them).     I had the privilege of MC'ing the Brewer Wives Event benefiting Sojourner Family Peace Center Friday night at Miller Park which, for that evening turned out being the world's largest NESCO cooker--storms meant the root AND panels had to be closed.     It was a swamp in there.

      The DVR is virtually empty--I'm caught up on all of my regular shows ("Rescue Me" and "Mad Men" are exceptional this season) and dipped into a few electives, including a NatGeo two-parter on Katrina (you can still find it on demand) that tells the tale of the storm through the lenses of plain folks who had the presence of mind to roll video during their ordeals.     I also caught Brian Williams' "Dateline" in which he looks back on what it was like being on the streets of New Orleans during the first few days after the hurricane.   Five years later, the question remains: how could we have left those people like that for so long?    And, why did this story have such a short shelf-life with the American public?    "Katrina fatigue" set in fairly fast, with people rapidly tiring of hearing about the plight of a great American city.     The 5th anniversary of the event gives the media a chance to revisit (as did the Super Bowl earlier this year) and I'm interested in seeing if anyone watches.     Or, does the "fatigue" have legs?

      The alarm clock had the week off, too.    It'll toll at 1:30 Wednesday morning, sending me off to pay for that kid in college and that shiny new toilet in the basement.    Vacations renew, and this one certainly did.     A week was long enough.     It's time to head back to one of the best radio jobs in the country.     It's time to get back into the routine.   

 

    

This site uses Facebook comments to make it easier for you to contribute. If you see a comment you would like to flag for spam or abuse, click the "x" in the upper right of it. By posting, you agree to our Terms of Use.

Milwaukee, WI

Clear
51°
Clear
Precip
20%
Humidity
71%
Wind
SW at 9 mph
Alerts
0

Current Promotions



More >>>


Submit photos to:
     
Hits   Country   Variety   Alternative
     
Totally 80's   Revelation   Summerfest   Rock

 

620 WTMJ